Theme

zooophagous:

kranja:

erisiana:

lazlo15:

10knotes:

omfg that is just too adorable

i can show you the world

FEELS

if i ever fail to reblog this, assume that i am dead

i love you so, witch cat and brave kitten

Its back

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Illustrated Book of Japanese Monsters by Gojin Ishihara

rhade-zapan:

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Kappa (river imp)

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Jorōgumo (lit. “whore spider”)

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Kubire-oni (strangler demon)

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Rokurokubi (long-necked woman)

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Onmoraki (bird demon)

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Nekomata (cat monster)

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Tengu (bird-like demon)

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Tenjō-sagari (ceiling dweller)

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Enma Dai-Ō (King of Hell)

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Kyūbi no kitsune (nine-tailed fox)

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Baku (dream-eating chimera)

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Yūrei (ghost)

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Yamasei (mountain sprite)

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Rashōmon no oni (ogre of Rashōmon Gate)

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Waira (mountain-dwelling chimera)

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Nure-onna (snake woman)

unimpressedcats:

you’re trying to take a picture? let me ruin it for you !!!

<3

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spiltsoymilk:

It’s Valentineees!

Awesome maddation asked if I could draw a valentines card for her and her girlfriend! It went a little overboard, though… Hope y’all like them
Have a pawsome day everyone

Oh yeah, and for you not-cat lovers, I made a dog one. 

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asylum-art:

Kris Kuksi Art

Facebook / on artnet

Born March 2, 1973, in Springfield Missouri and growing up in neighboring Kansas, Kris Kuksi spent his youth in rural seclusion and isolation along with a blue-collar, working mother, two significantly older brothers, and an absent father. Open country, sparse trees, and alcoholic stepfather, all paving the way for an individual saturated in imagination and introversion. His propensity for the unusual has been a constant since childhood, a lifelong fascination that lent itself to his macabre art later in life. The grotesque to him, as it seemed, was beautiful.

“A post-industrial Rococo master, Kris Kuksi obsessively arranges characters and architecture in asymmetric compositions with an exquisite sense of drama. Instead of stones and shells he uses screaming plastic soldiers, miniature engine blocks, towering spires and assorted debris to form his landscapes. The political, spiritual and material conflict within these shrines is enacted under the calm gaze of remote deities and august statuary. Kuksi manages to evoke, at once, a sanctum and a mausoleum for our suffocated spirit.” ~Guillermo del Toro

via I need a guide

Catwoman, from Cover Girls by Guillem March

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